Trifusion News

Structural Repair in Action

Posted by on Jul 29, 2016 in Foundations, Slab Lifting, Trifusion Foundation Repair Events, Trifusion News | Comments Off on Structural Repair in Action

Not every structural repair job we do yields dramatic results.  Maybe the patio was just a little uneven, or there was a dip in the living room floor.  But sometimes those little problems become big problems, and restoring the home’s foundation to its original glory is quite a sight to see. We had just such a job last month, and our client was excited to share her before and after pictures with...

Read More

Summer Foundation Issues

Posted by on Jun 1, 2016 in erosion, Foundations, Oklahoma Weather, Piering, Slab Lifting, Trifusion Foundation Repair Events, Trifusion News | Comments Off on Summer Foundation Issues

Summer Foundation Issues

June is here, and summer weather is fast approaching.  With our mild winter and extremely wet spring, experts have predicted that the coming months will be extremely hot and extremely dry.  While that makes for great pool weather, it’s also going to exacerbate any foundation problems you may already have. Drought So what happens when the monsoon stops and the temperature rises?  As the soil around and under your home dries out, it contracts and settles, which reveals voids under slab foundations and can destabilize your home piering.  It’s not that the voids weren’t already there when the soil was wet, it’s just that the moisture in the soil was masking the problem. Seasonal Shifting Have you ever noticed cracks by the corners of your door frames, or on your exterior masonry, that seem to disappear in the winter and reopen in the summer (or vice-verse)?  If you have, and you mentioned to a Tulsa foundation repair company, you might be familiar with the term “seasonal shift.”  What this means is that your foundation is moving depending on whether the soil is wet or dry.  If not repaired, this shifting could result in a cracked slab or larger, year-round cracks in your...

Read More

Meet the Team

Posted by on Apr 8, 2016 in Trifusion Foundation Repair Events, Trifusion News | Comments Off on Meet the Team

I love working for a locally-owned business; I know the names and faces of everyone I work with, and they know mine. Our clients also trust us more.  If you call into the office, nine times out of ten you’ll be speaking to me (at least initially), and if you sign with us you’ll wind up meeting the whole team at some point or other. And that’s all well and good, but who, exactly, are we? First of all, we have the owner and primary project surveyor, Mike.  He’s worked in the field for over thirty years, and is the go-to guy for polyurethane foam injection.  He and  our other project surveyor, Marc, are the first on the scene to help find a solution to whatever problems your home is facing. Next is Lindsey, our general manager.  She oversees pier crews, schedules jobs, and makes sure everyone’s where they’re supposed to be, when they’re supposed to be. And that brings us to me!  I wear a lot of hats, but my two main functions are office manager and marketing assistant.  On any given day I may be writing content for this website, updating our various social media sites, booking consultations, running errands…in fact, I just got back from delivering a concrete saw to a job site in Claremore.  I also meet with our clients when the work is done to make sure that everything is the way it’s supposed to be, go over final paperwork, etc.  There’s a very good chance that mine will be the first voice you hear, and the last face you see. Now I’ve got to go meet with a client – I hope you’re able to get out and enjoy the sunshine too!  ...

Read More

On The Job

Posted by on Apr 5, 2016 in Foundations, Slab Lifting, Trifusion Foundation Repair Events, Trifusion News | Comments Off on On The Job

A lot of my work can be done in front of a keyboard – writing these posts, for instance – so it’s always fun for me to get to go to a job and see our crews in action.  And last Friday that’s exactly what I did!  Our client is renovating a rental property and has slab issues.     A lot of slab issues.     (Those straight grooves are called stitching, and are re-filled after the crack is repair to “stitch” the concrete back together.) I wasn’t there for my own curiosity though, I was there because I’d never actually seen our foam injection lifting technique in action – and how can I write about something I’ve never witnessed? Now, I’ve been told that not all lifts are this dramatic, but check out this video of the slab correction we did in the back room:     Isn’t that cool?   We’ve got another foam job scheduled for this Friday, and I’m keeping my fingers crossed for more excitement!  ...

Read More

Why Foam Injection?

Posted by on Mar 28, 2016 in Trifusion Foundation Repair Events, Trifusion News | Comments Off on Why Foam Injection?

Why Foam Injection?

I’ve discussed previously the reason(s) why we don’t do interior piering – namely, it’s not the best solution.  But polyurethane foam injection has only been around for about 30 years, and slab foundations predate it.  So what did people do to fill voids before foam? Well, foam injection falls under the umbrella of “grout injection,” and until the 1980s, that meant cementitious grout – in other words, cement. Just like with foam injection, holes were drilled in the concrete slab, and more concrete was injected into the void beneath.  While this was effective, it was also incredibly heavy – and though there are different weights of polyurethane foam, ours is four pounds.  It relies on hydraulic pressure rather than sheer weight to compact soil and lift the slab, and is much less likely to break down over time. Ultimately, the takeaway is that home repair, just like everything else, is a constantly evolving field, and we’re happy to bring these innovations to your projects!  ...

Read More

Tulsa Architecture

Posted by on Mar 24, 2016 in Oklahoma Weather, Trifusion Foundation Repair Events, Trifusion News | Comments Off on Tulsa Architecture

Tulsa Architecture

Did you know that Tulsa has one of the largest Art Deco districts in the country?  It makes sense: at the turn of the century, Tulsa was a booming oil metropolis.  But our beautiful downtown is only the beginning of a century’s worth of expansion, in the form of neighborhoods that spread out like tree rings, each one an architectural time capsule. Most of Tulsa Metro’s residential areas were built between the 20s and 50s; the further Southeast you go, the newer the homes get.  Tulsa Metro, also known as midtown, includes (but is not limited to) neighborhoods like Cherry Street, The Pearl District, Kendall-Whittier, Riverparks, and Patrick Henry.  A lot of these areas were built before Zink Dam was put in on the Arkansas River, and flooding was even more of a problem than it is now (my mother remembers having severe flood damage in her home during the mid-50s, two blocks in from Riverside).  Consequently, many of these homes are going to be on crawl spaces.  The same holds true for the neighborhoods that extend North from downtown, where neighborhoods like Brady Heights, Greenwood, and North Cheyenne have seen restoration and revitalization, including the addition of “Historic” to their monikers. It wasn’t until the 60s and 70s that Broken Arrow, Bixby, Jenks, and our various other suburbs started seeing significant growth, eventually blending seamlessly with Tulsa Metro.  South of 1-44 and East of Sheridan, South Tulsa and surrounding neighborhoods are largely slab foundations.  Contractors had found that in regions with water tables as high as ours, slab foundations were better for preventing moisture damage to the homes sitting on top of them. Regardless of where you live, I think we can all agree: we wouldn’t have our slice of urban sprawl any other...

Read More