Buying Or Selling A Home

Solving Drainage Issues

Posted by on Mar 31, 2016 in Buying Or Selling A Home, Foundation Drainage, Oklahoma Weather, Trifusion Foundation Repair Events | Comments Off on Solving Drainage Issues

Solving Drainage Issues

I want to start by saying that we at Trifusion have those injured by last night’s storm in our thoughts today, and that we’re all thankful that there were no fatalities.   But it does highlight the fact that storm season is officially upon us.  And naturally, spring rains always highlight the biggest problem for Oklahoma foundations: drainage. In theory, your home’s gutters are going to be doing a lot of the heavy lifting in this area, by funneling the water away from your home.  However, all those gutters do is catch runoff from your roof and channel it into one corner downspout.  It helps, yes, but it doesn’t solve the problem of all the rest of the rain – and often the downspout doesn’t direct the water far enough away to do more than have it only affect that corner of the house.  To that end, one of the most up-and-coming popular solutions is to install a French drain. A French drain is a gravel trench dug around all or part of your home, with a perforated pipe hidden inside.  It’s kind of a reverse moat: excess groundwater flows into the pipe through the gravel, and the pipe in turn empties out somewhere away from the home.  They’re easy to maintain, are unobtrusive, and can go a long way toward maintaining your foundation’s integrity as well as reducing problems such as ponding (where a depression in a driveway or walkway fills with water, creating a temporary pond).    “Gravel trench” doesn’t sound very attractive, but decorative rock can be used to turn them into a beautiful landscaping feature.  And hey, if you find yourself needing one, give us a call!  ...

Read More

Do You Need an Engineer’s Report?

Posted by on Mar 2, 2016 in Buying Or Selling A Home | Comments Off on Do You Need an Engineer’s Report?

One question we get from clients is about engineer’s reports – what is it, do they need one, and what’s the benefit? An engineer’s report is done by a state certified engineer, and is generally an overview of what your home may need by way of repairs.  They’re handy for a few reasons. Unbiased Opinion If you’re going to be comparing home piering or slab lifting quotes from several foundation repair companies (which is a good practice) and you’re not sure what might be needed, an engineer’s report ensures that you have a clear objective.  Each company will review the report and give you an estimate based on what the engineer has outlined – essentially giving you a professional opinion off of which to base any work. Streamlined Process Our company offers free estimates, but many places charge for their initial inspection – it stands to reason, right?  It takes time to come out to a new property and do an assessment.  Oftentimes though, if you have an engineer’s report, companies can give you an estimate based on that, which means instead of each company coming out and giving you their opinion (and potentially charging you for the time), you only have to set aside one day for an engineer.  We prefer to look at the report and the property before we give an estimate, but it still helps us know exactly what to look for, and can give an estimate from the report alone if needed. Peace of Mind There’s a lot to be said for record keeping.  If you’re going to be selling your house, having something that says “here’s what was needed and here’s what we did” is invaluable, both to you and your potential buyer.   All of this being said, an engineer’s report is going to run around $300-$425 (based on square footage), which is on top of the cost of any repairs you may need.  But if you feel that that’s the right way to go, we’d be happy to point you towards a licensed and trusted expert when you call us for your free estimate....

Read More

Signs of a Settling Home

Posted by on Feb 26, 2016 in Buying Or Selling A Home | Comments Off on Signs of a Settling Home

Signs of a Settling Home

As promised, today I’m going to talk about how to recognize signs of a settling house. The most obvious indicator is your driveway.  Much like a slab foundation, if you have a paved driveway, that’s going to be a thick layer of concrete over Oklahoma’s silt loam.  If it’s starting to crack, there’s a good chance your foundation could use an inspection.  Similarly, many houses in the Tulsa area have brick or stucco facing.  A crack on the outside of your home (or inside, for that matter) is a pretty clear sign that something is amiss. But there are several indicators that the soil beneath your house has settled, and not all of them are as blatant. For instance, new drafts popping up through window frames and door jambs are great indicators that your house may not be level.  It makes sense: these openings are designed to have 90 degree angles at all corners.  When your house shifts, the frames shift, and while the frame no longer has those perfect angles, the things attached to those frames (the doors or windows themselves) do.  We’ve had clients whose front doors were completely unusable because they were stuck in crooked jambs. Another sign is if you notice tables and chairs no long sitting level.  Now, this could be the piece of furniture itself, but if all the legs measure up properly and you still can’t keep a marble from rolling off, that may be an indication of bigger problems.  To use another client example, we were able to help someone whose bedroom was so uneven that when they laid down on the bed, their feet were higher than their head. Lastly, and this one comes from personal experience, check for excess moisture by your baseboards.  While this could easily be a baseboard problem, the high water table means that if your foundation cracks, ground water may very well seep through and bring its own host of issues. Thanks for reading, now go forth and have a great...

Read More

From Red Dirt to Green Country

Posted by on Feb 24, 2016 in Buying Or Selling A Home, Oklahoma Weather | Comments Off on From Red Dirt to Green Country

From Red Dirt to Green Country

Did you know that Oklahoma has a State Soil?  Unsurprisingly, it’s the red dirt that we’re so fond of – just like on this road east of Kingfisher, OK. The official name is “Port silt loam,” or Cumulic haplustolls.  It gets its red color from high levels of iron oxide (rust), and its soft texture from being a mix of sand, clay, and silt – a kind of extra-fine sand often transported by flowing water, and found in high quantities on flood plains.  It was this soil that, combined with damaging farming techniques, caused the Dust Bowl in the 1930s. Now, Port silt loam is only found in about half the state – Northeast Oklahoma is known as Green Country specifically because it lacks that trademark red dirt.  But just because it’s not red doesn’t mean it’s not chock-full of clay and silt. Regardless of the color of your soil, it’s important to keep an eye out for settling and erosion.  The easiest way to fight erosion around your home is to keep it in bloom: trees, shrubs, and other plant life help water be dispersed evenly through the soil, and the roots provide a certain amount of structure.  And as discussed in my last post, they way your home is built (either with a gravel bed beneath your slab foundation or with piers supporting your crawl space foundation) will do a lot to curb the affects of settling. Tune in on Friday to learn how to recognize signs of a settling house!  ...

Read More

Oklahoma Foundations

Posted by on Feb 22, 2016 in Buying Or Selling A Home | Comments Off on Oklahoma Foundations

As anyone living in Oklahoma can tell you, flooding is not an if, it’s a when.  That’s because the water table is so high: our ground water is very close to the surface, making our soil moist and the region prone to flooding, particularly in spring.  Consequently, very few homes have basements. So what does this mean for your home’s foundation?  Well, it means that you’re sitting on one of two things: a slab, or a crawl space.  Here’s a basic rundown of both! Crawl Space A crawl space foundation is what it sounds like – there’s a space of about two feet above the ground, over which your home is supported using something called a pier and beam system.  This acts as a series of concrete and rebar stilts that are set into holes beneath your home and can be adjusted to keep your home level.  We see a lot of crawl space foundations in Tulsa, because they’re excellent for areas with high water tables.   Slab Foundation The slab foundation is also fairly self-explanatory: instead of being set up on piers, the home rests directly on a concrete slab (about six to eight inches thick), which itself rests on a bed of gravel to facilitate drainage.  Since there isn’t space between the foundation and home for plumbing and other utilities (like with a crawl space), these are often run through holes drilled directly into the foundation.  Slab foundations are more sensitive to shifting earth, especially if drainage isn’t great. Why Does This Matter? As soil floods and drains, it shifts.  This is great if you’re planting a garden and are using a watering can to keep air bubbles away from your plant’s roots, but when the soil under your home shifts, your foundation and home shift too.  This can lead to small annoyances, like your dining room table being slightly uneven, or large problems, like your door frames being too crooked to open or close doors – including your front door! More to the point, the type of foundation determines what type of repair you need.  Check out our pages on piering and polyurethane foam injection to see what goes into getting you back on even footing – no matter your...

Read More

100% Repair Guarantee

Posted by on May 18, 2014 in Buying Or Selling A Home, Uncategorized | Comments Off on 100% Repair Guarantee

100% Repair Guarantee

At Trifusion Foundation Repair, we are so confident in the quality of our repair work that we offer an industry leading, 100% transferable warranty: a 20 Year warranty on interior slab and exterior piers, and a 10 Year warranty on polyurethane foam injection.

Read More