Trifusion Blog

FAQ – Interior Piers

Posted by on Mar 16, 2016 in Trifusion Foundation Repair Events | Comments Off on FAQ – Interior Piers

FAQ – Interior Piers

Another question we kept getting over the weekend was about interior piers – namely, do we do them? The short answer is no.  The explanation is a little longer. No one worth their salt will do interior piers anymore, and the reason is because it’s not a good system.  It’s very difficult to get an even distribution of weight on interior piers, and if your house settles, those piers are the foundation equivalent of trying to prop up a tarp full of water by pushing a stick up through the middle.  Instead, for interior settling, polyurethane foam injection is a much more stable and durable fix, and won’t result in future damage like what you see in the attached photo.   As a bonus, polyurethane foam injection is also less invasive, cheaper, and sets up within seconds, which makes the job quicker to complete. Check back later this week for another FAQ!  ...

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FAQ: Peace of Mind

Posted by on Mar 14, 2016 in Trifusion Foundation Repair Events, Trifusion News | Comments Off on FAQ: Peace of Mind

As I said last week, this past weekend the entire Trifusion team was down at Expo Square for the Home and Garden Show.  I love working those kinds of events, because it allows me to talk directly to a lot of people about their needs and concerns. Time and time again, we heard the same thing: homeowners afraid to even get an estimate because they’re convinced they can’t afford the fix. Now, there are some companies that do charge to come out for an estimate, but we don’t.  It’s important to us that we make giving you the information you need an easy process – after all, if you don’t know what you need, you don’t know what to plan for.  On top of that, we do offer several financing options; your home should be a source of comfort, not a source of stress. Thanks to everyone who stopped by our booth to say hello, and thanks to our readers who bore with me through last week’s hiatus!  ...

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Tulsa Home and Garden Show

Posted by on Mar 8, 2016 in Trifusion Foundation Repair Events | Comments Off on Tulsa Home and Garden Show

Hi everyone!  We’re all hands on deck while we prepare for the Tulsa Home and Garden Show (March 10th through 13th) at the Expo Center!  Come visit the Golden Driller on your way in to see us at the Trifusion booth, on the first floor next to the ramp.  Hang out, have a chat, and pick up one of our brand new fridge magnets! Blog posts will resume next week – see you soon!  ...

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Do You Need an Engineer’s Report?

Posted by on Mar 2, 2016 in Buying Or Selling A Home | Comments Off on Do You Need an Engineer’s Report?

One question we get from clients is about engineer’s reports – what is it, do they need one, and what’s the benefit? An engineer’s report is done by a state certified engineer, and is generally an overview of what your home may need by way of repairs.  They’re handy for a few reasons. Unbiased Opinion If you’re going to be comparing home piering or slab lifting quotes from several foundation repair companies (which is a good practice) and you’re not sure what might be needed, an engineer’s report ensures that you have a clear objective.  Each company will review the report and give you an estimate based on what the engineer has outlined – essentially giving you a professional opinion off of which to base any work. Streamlined Process Our company offers free estimates, but many places charge for their initial inspection – it stands to reason, right?  It takes time to come out to a new property and do an assessment.  Oftentimes though, if you have an engineer’s report, companies can give you an estimate based on that, which means instead of each company coming out and giving you their opinion (and potentially charging you for the time), you only have to set aside one day for an engineer.  We prefer to look at the report and the property before we give an estimate, but it still helps us know exactly what to look for, and can give an estimate from the report alone if needed. Peace of Mind There’s a lot to be said for record keeping.  If you’re going to be selling your house, having something that says “here’s what was needed and here’s what we did” is invaluable, both to you and your potential buyer.   All of this being said, an engineer’s report is going to run around $300-$425 (based on square footage), which is on top of the cost of any repairs you may need.  But if you feel that that’s the right way to go, we’d be happy to point you towards a licensed and trusted expert when you call us for your free estimate....

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Weather Patterns – Spring

Posted by on Feb 29, 2016 in Oklahoma Weather | Comments Off on Weather Patterns – Spring

Weather Patterns – Spring

As you’ve probably heard, El Nino has been wreaking havoc on our weather.  We’ve had major flooding over both Thanksgiving and Christmas, 80 degrees and sunny in February – and while not related to the weather, let’s not forget that Oklahoma is now the earthquake capitol of the country. All of these things affect what problems home owners face, and every season is different.  Let’s take a look at what the first blush of spring is doing to our region. Frost Heaves I’m from Alaska, and lived in an area where residential roads weren’t paved.  The city refused to waste the money: every spring the ice melts, the roads thaw, and suddenly there’s a brand new crop of pot holes. But that’s Alaska, and to be expected.  Who expects frost heaves in Oklahoma?  Well, Oklahoman’s do – especially in the last few years. Frost heaves occur when the moisture in the soil freezes.  Ice takes up more space than water, so as the ice crystals expand, so does the soil around them.  Then spring comes and those ice crystals melt, leaving air pockets and compacted areas of soil, altering the terrain.  Because of Oklahoma’s uniquely temperamental weather, this freezing and thawing can happen multiple times over the course of a winter (which only makes the problem worse).   Now, frost heaves don’t just affect our roads, they affect anything sitting on our soil.  So if you see a lot of new pot holes in your street or neighborhood, it might be worth your time to take a look around your home for the signs of settling that I discussed in this post. Flooding Something we’re well aware of and used to is flooding.  Oklahoma, particularly the Northeast, sits on a flood plane that lives up to its name every spring.  When our beautiful thunderstorms hit and bring those heavy rains with them, they knock out any air pockets frost heaves may have left as well as washing away some soil when the water finally drains away.  Thankfully a well-planted yard will help curtail that erosion, but it’s still important to check your home for issues after any major flood. Earthquakes In the grand scheme of things, our earthquakes tend to be on the mild side.  You might feel a little bit of a shake or hear your dishes rattle, but for the most part they’re more a point of interest than a safety hazard. Unless, of course, you’re something in or dependent on the ground that is literally shaking apart.   Our earthquakes may be year-round, but when you combine them with the above two geographically-impactful seasonal hazards, things can get a little more hairy.  That final jolt may be all your driveway needs to spring a new crack, or all your piering needs to settle on one side.  Unfortunately for us, no amount of crepe myrtles will stop an earthquake from affecting our land, so the best thing you can do is be mindful of the shifting geography and, again, be proactive about watching your home for new issues.   Spring is easily the most tumultuous season for Oklahoma.  Once we get through the floods, thunderstorms, and tornadoes it’ll be smooth sailing…right into the triple digits.  So put up your feet and have a nice hot cup of...

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Signs of a Settling Home

Posted by on Feb 26, 2016 in Buying Or Selling A Home | Comments Off on Signs of a Settling Home

Signs of a Settling Home

As promised, today I’m going to talk about how to recognize signs of a settling house. The most obvious indicator is your driveway.  Much like a slab foundation, if you have a paved driveway, that’s going to be a thick layer of concrete over Oklahoma’s silt loam.  If it’s starting to crack, there’s a good chance your foundation could use an inspection.  Similarly, many houses in the Tulsa area have brick or stucco facing.  A crack on the outside of your home (or inside, for that matter) is a pretty clear sign that something is amiss. But there are several indicators that the soil beneath your house has settled, and not all of them are as blatant. For instance, new drafts popping up through window frames and door jambs are great indicators that your house may not be level.  It makes sense: these openings are designed to have 90 degree angles at all corners.  When your house shifts, the frames shift, and while the frame no longer has those perfect angles, the things attached to those frames (the doors or windows themselves) do.  We’ve had clients whose front doors were completely unusable because they were stuck in crooked jambs. Another sign is if you notice tables and chairs no long sitting level.  Now, this could be the piece of furniture itself, but if all the legs measure up properly and you still can’t keep a marble from rolling off, that may be an indication of bigger problems.  To use another client example, we were able to help someone whose bedroom was so uneven that when they laid down on the bed, their feet were higher than their head. Lastly, and this one comes from personal experience, check for excess moisture by your baseboards.  While this could easily be a baseboard problem, the high water table means that if your foundation cracks, ground water may very well seep through and bring its own host of issues. Thanks for reading, now go forth and have a great...

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From Red Dirt to Green Country

Posted by on Feb 24, 2016 in Buying Or Selling A Home, Oklahoma Weather | Comments Off on From Red Dirt to Green Country

From Red Dirt to Green Country

Did you know that Oklahoma has a State Soil?  Unsurprisingly, it’s the red dirt that we’re so fond of – just like on this road east of Kingfisher, OK. The official name is “Port silt loam,” or Cumulic haplustolls.  It gets its red color from high levels of iron oxide (rust), and its soft texture from being a mix of sand, clay, and silt – a kind of extra-fine sand often transported by flowing water, and found in high quantities on flood plains.  It was this soil that, combined with damaging farming techniques, caused the Dust Bowl in the 1930s. Now, Port silt loam is only found in about half the state – Northeast Oklahoma is known as Green Country specifically because it lacks that trademark red dirt.  But just because it’s not red doesn’t mean it’s not chock-full of clay and silt. Regardless of the color of your soil, it’s important to keep an eye out for settling and erosion.  The easiest way to fight erosion around your home is to keep it in bloom: trees, shrubs, and other plant life help water be dispersed evenly through the soil, and the roots provide a certain amount of structure.  And as discussed in my last post, they way your home is built (either with a gravel bed beneath your slab foundation or with piers supporting your crawl space foundation) will do a lot to curb the affects of settling. Tune in on Friday to learn how to recognize signs of a settling house!  ...

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Oklahoma Foundations

Posted by on Feb 22, 2016 in Buying Or Selling A Home | Comments Off on Oklahoma Foundations

As anyone living in Oklahoma can tell you, flooding is not an if, it’s a when.  That’s because the water table is so high: our ground water is very close to the surface, making our soil moist and the region prone to flooding, particularly in spring.  Consequently, very few homes have basements. So what does this mean for your home’s foundation?  Well, it means that you’re sitting on one of two things: a slab, or a crawl space.  Here’s a basic rundown of both! Crawl Space A crawl space foundation is what it sounds like – there’s a space of about two feet above the ground, over which your home is supported using something called a pier and beam system.  This acts as a series of concrete and rebar stilts that are set into holes beneath your home and can be adjusted to keep your home level.  We see a lot of crawl space foundations in Tulsa, because they’re excellent for areas with high water tables.   Slab Foundation The slab foundation is also fairly self-explanatory: instead of being set up on piers, the home rests directly on a concrete slab (about six to eight inches thick), which itself rests on a bed of gravel to facilitate drainage.  Since there isn’t space between the foundation and home for plumbing and other utilities (like with a crawl space), these are often run through holes drilled directly into the foundation.  Slab foundations are more sensitive to shifting earth, especially if drainage isn’t great. Why Does This Matter? As soil floods and drains, it shifts.  This is great if you’re planting a garden and are using a watering can to keep air bubbles away from your plant’s roots, but when the soil under your home shifts, your foundation and home shift too.  This can lead to small annoyances, like your dining room table being slightly uneven, or large problems, like your door frames being too crooked to open or close doors – including your front door! More to the point, the type of foundation determines what type of repair you need.  Check out our pages on piering and polyurethane foam injection to see what goes into getting you back on even footing – no matter your...

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Welcome!

Posted by on Feb 22, 2016 in Trifusion News | Comments Off on Welcome!

Welcome to the Trifusion blog! I’m Brianna, and I’ll be posting all sorts of helpful information about home maintenance, particularly in regards to how Oklahoma’s soil and climate can affect your foundation. Stay tuned for tips on how to spot a problem, when to look, and the history of home construction in Northeast Oklahoma – among other things!  

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Pic12

Posted by on May 19, 2014 in pic | Comments Off on Pic12

Pic12

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